CAA 2019

The 107th Annual Conference of the College Art Association will be held at the New York Hilton Midtown, 13–16 February 2019. HBA will be represented by several events including this session on climate change, chaired by Jongwoo Jeremy Kim (abstracts are available as a Word document here).

Climate Change and British Art (HBA)
Friday, 15 February, 8:30am, Room: Gramercy East

Chair: Jongwoo Jeremy Kim (Associate Professor of Critical Studies / Art History and Theory, School of Art, Carnegie Mellon University)

They say Britons obsess over the weather. Alexander Cozens, John Constable, and J. M. W. Turner certainly ruined any prospect of ever dislodging British visual legacy from meteorology. Yet, this centuries-old visual history of grappling with humankind’s relationship with nature seems unprecedentedly urgent at a time when climate change denial has become a tremendous political force affecting national and local elections. In response to the current global environmental crisis, Britain’s 2005 Turner Prize winner Simon Starling rode an electric bicycle through the Spanish desert. His vehicle burned no fossil fuels and produced no smoke. Instead, the contraption collected water. With the water sourced from this punishing human labor, Starling made a watercolor of a cactus like a Regency botanist. Similarly, the Liberate Tate group’s protest performances against the oil giant BP’s corporate sponsorship of art institutions remind us that our historical consciousness must reflect recent developments in art-based environmental activism. Spurred by artists like Starling and works like License to Spill, 2010 (“a miniature oil spill at the Tate’s summer gala”), the Historians of British Art invites papers that examine the relationship between climate change, sustainability, the Anthropocene, and British art on a global scale. Papers that draw on critical debates about art and the politics of ecology, representations of ecological vulnerability and resilience, and contemporary visuality responding to climate change and the global economy are particularly welcome. ‘British Art’ is broadly defined to include works by artists who actively engage in decolonization in the former British colonies.

Nicholas Robbins (Doctoral Candidate, History of Art, Yale University), Luke Howard and the Normal Landscape
• Alison Syme (Associate Professor of Modern Art History, Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto), Abnatural Climates of the Kelmscott Chaucer
• Kate Flint (Provost Professor of Art History and English, University of Southern California), Lichen, Climate Change, and Ecological Aesthetics
• Ian Bourland (Assistant Professor of Art History, Department of Art and Art History, Georgetown University), After the Flood: John Akomfrah’s Images of the Anthropocene

Discussants:
• Kimberly Rhodes, Professor of Art History, Department of Art History, Drew University
• Nadja Verena Marcin, Artist (MFA, Columbia University, 2010)

Call for Nominations | HBA Book Awards

The Historians of British Art annually awards prizes to outstanding books on the history of British art, architecture, and visual culture. We are pleased to announce that we will consider books in four categories: Pre-1800, 1600–1800, Post-1800, and multi-authored volume. The committee is currently welcoming nominations for this year’s prize. A list of previous winners can be found here. This year we will be considering books published in 2017.

The committee accepts nominations and self-nominations, although these should include publisher contact details. There is no limit on the number of books from a single publisher that may be considered in each category. Winners will be announced in January 2019, well in advance of the annual meeting of the College Art Association in February, so that publishers can market prize-winners there. The deadline for nominations is 1 October 2018. Feel free to contact Morna O’Neill, the committee chair, with any questions, oneillme@wfu.edu.

Publishers should notify the chair of their nominations and send a copy of each nominated book to our four committee members:

Morna O’Neill, Chair
2224 Westover Drive
Wake Forest University
Winston-Salem, NC 27103
336-758-3925

Matthew Reeve
Department of Art History and Art Conservation
Ontario Hall
Queen’s University
Kingston, ON
K7l3N6

Stacey Sloboda
Art Department
UMass Boston
100 Morrissey Boulevard
Boston, MA 02125

Eric Stryker
14 Holly Place
Edison, NJ 08817

Book Award Winners for 2016 Publications

The Historians of British Art is pleased to announce Book Award winners for publications from 2016. Awards are granted in three categories:

Pre-1800

Marcia Kupfer, Art and Optics in the Hereford Map: An English Mappa Mundi, c. 1300 (New Haven: Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, 2016), 240 pages, ISBN: 978-0300220339, $85.

Post-1800

Lucy Curzon, Mass-Observation and Visual Culture: Depicting Everyday Lives in Britain (New York: Routledge, 2016), 182 pages, ISBN: 9781472436504, $150.

Catherine Roach, Pictures-within-Pictures in Nineteenth-Century Britain (New York Routledge, 2016), 218 pages, ISBN: 9781472454690, $150.

Multi-Author

Eleanor Hughes, ed., with contributions by Eleanor Hughes, Richard Johns, Sophie Lynford, John McAleer, Christine Riding, Catherine Roach, Geoff Quilley, and Pieter van der Merwe, Spreading Canvas: Eighteenth-Century British Marine Painting (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2016), 312 pages, ISBN: 9780300221572, $75.

Details are available here»

HBA at CAA 2018, Los Angeles

In 2018, CAA will return to LA for its 106th Annual Conference. The four-day event will be held at the Los Angeles Convention Center from Wednesday, February 21 through Saturday, February 24. HBA will be represented by an affiliate session , a business meeting that will include a conversation with the editorial team of British Art Studies, and an off-site visit to the LACMA’s Study Center for Photography and Works on Paper. Note: Please confirm times and locations with the conference program.

The Image of the American Indian in Nineteenth-Century Britain: New Critical Perspectives
Thursday, 22 February 2018, 8:30–10:00am, Room 506

Chairs: Martina Droth (Yale Center for British Art) and Michael Hatt (Warwick University)

The study of the representation of American Indians has gained increasing attention in recent scholarship. This history, however, has been almost exclusively written from a North American perspective. In nineteenth-century Britain a widespread fascination with Native American cultures was connected to wider debates about empire and the transatlantic world. But what Kate Flint termed the ‘Transatlantic Indian’ in her pioneering study has remained largely unexamined. This interdisciplinary session seeks to explore the various ways in which native peoples from the United States and Canada, and the artifacts of their cultures, were being represented, portrayed, studied, and collected in Britain in the long nineteenth century.

• Scott Manning Stevens (Syracuse University), Resisting the Declension Narrative: The Image of the Iroquois in the Victorian Age
• Dominic Hardy (Université du Québec à Montréal), British Satirical Reception of North American Indigenous Performers and Their Work in the 1840s: Methodological Perspectives
• Emily L. Voelker (Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art), William Blackmore and Transatlantic Networks of Creation and Dissemination in William Henry Jackson’s Photographs of North American Indians (1877)

HBA Field Trip
Curator-led session at the LACMA Study Center for Photography and Works on Paper
Thursday, 22 February 2018, 2:30–4:30pm

In this private study session, LACMA Curator Britt Salvesen will discuss highlights from LACMA’s collection of British photographs and works on paper. The event is limited to 10–15 members of the Historians of British Art. Please RSVP to Emily Talbot, etalbot@nortonsimon.org, by 1 February 2018.

HBA Business Meeting
Friday, 23 February 2018,12:30–1:30pm, Room 407

HBA Business Meeting Special Event | Publishing on British Art in a Global Context: A Conversation with the Editorial Team of British Art Studies
Friday, 23 February 2018,1:00–1:30pm, Room 407

Join Martina Droth, Sarah Turner, and the editorial team of British Art Studies for a discussion of the challenges and opportunities in publishing on British art in the era of transnational, digital, and global art history. The conversation will encompass new digital innovations in British art publishing, the importance of Empire histories, and a re-evaluation of the definition of ‘British Art’ in the current moment.

Call for Papers | HBA Session at CAA, 2018

At the 106th annual conference of the College Art Association, HBA will be represented by an affiliate session (with details below), a business meeting, and an off-site visit (still in the planning stages). A full list of panels is available from the 2018 Call for Participation.

The Image of the American Indian in Britain, ca. 1800–1930: New Critical Perspectives
Los Angeles Convention Center, 21–24 February 2018

Proposals due by 14 August 2017

The study of the representation of American Indians has gained increasing attention in recent scholarship. This history, however, has been almost exclusively written from a North American perspective. In nineteenth-century Britain a widespread fascination with Native American cultures was connected to wider debates about empire and the transatlantic world. But what Kate Flint termed the “Transatlantic Indian” in her pioneering study has remained largely unexamined. This interdisciplinary session seeks to explore the various ways in which native peoples from the United States and Canada, and the artifacts of their cultures, were being represented, portrayed, studied, and collected in Britain in the long nineteenth century. Possible topics for discussion might include: Buffalo Bill’s Wild West shows and other live performances; George Catlin’s Indian Gallery in London; ethnographic museums and displays; displays of sculptures at the international exhibitions and other venues; photography and its circulation; and illustrations and the printed press. We welcome papers that address specific case studies or larger conceptual issues. This session is sponsored by the Historians of British Art.

To submit a proposal, please follow CAA guidelines. Proposals should be submitted directly to the session chairs: Martina Droth, Yale Center for British Art (martina.droth@yale.edu), and Michael Hatt, Warwick University (M.Hatt@warwick.ac.uk).

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Book Award Winners for 2015 Publications

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The Historians of British Art is pleased to announce Book Award winners for publications from 2015. The winners were chosen from a nominating list of over eighty books from more than twenty different presses. Awards are granted in three categories:

Pre-1800

Margaret Aston, Broken Idols of the English Reformation (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2015), 1128 pages, ISBN: 978  05217  70187, $200.

Post-1800

Jordan Bear, Disillusioned: Victorian Photography and the Discerning Subject (University Park: Penn State University Press, 2015), 216 pages, ISBN: 978  02710  65014, $75.

Multi-Author

Lucy Bradnock, Courtney J. Martin, and Rebecca Peabody, eds., Lawrence Alloway: Critic and Curator (Los Angeles: Getty Research Institute, 2015), 224 pages, ISBN 978  16060  64429, $40.

Tarnya Cooper, Aviva Burnstock, Maurice Howard, and Edward Town, eds., Painting in Britain, 1500–1630: Production, Influences, and Patronage (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015), 400 pages, ISBN: 978  019726  5840, $250.

Details are available here»

HBA Publication Grant

Applications due by 15 January 2017

Each year HBA awards a grant to offset publication costs for a book manuscript or peer-reviewed journal article in the field of British art or visual culture that has been accepted for publication. To be eligible for the $600 award, applicants must be current members of HBA who can demonstrate that the HBA subvention will replace their out of pocket costs. Applications are not accepted from institutions. To apply, send a 500-word project description, publication information (correspondence from press or journal confirming commitment to publish and projected publication date), budget, and CV to Kimberly Rhodes, HBA Prize Committee Chair, krhodes@drew.edu by 15 January 2017.

Now Taking Nominations: Top 100 British Art Books, 1600–1850

Strawberry_Hill_Library

The 100 Most Important Books for Understanding British Art, 1600–1850

As a cooperative initiative with Choice Magazine, the Historians of British Art (HBA) is working to assemble a list of the most important books for understanding British art produced between 1600 and 1850. The project, which will result in a bibliographic review essay for Choice, is particularly aimed at strengthening library holdings, and so nominations of studies broad in scope or significance are especially useful. In addition to studies of paintings, sculpture, and print culture, scholarship addressing country houses, gardens, decorative arts, patronage, and the history of exhibitions and collections for the period are welcome. Exhibition catalogues, historiographical studies, and works that situate British art within international contexts are also welcome. Books published within the past 10–20 years will anchor the final list, but nominations of titles from any period are eligible. Self-nominations are entirely appropriate. Don’t be shy. Nominate early and often!

Nominations may be submitted here—through the comments function—or emailed directly to HBA president, Craig Hanson, Top100BritishArtBooks@gmail.com. Nominations due by June 1.

Image: John Carter, View of the Library at Strawberry Hill, watercolour, 23.7 × 28.8 cm, from Horace Walpole, A Description of the Villa … at Strawberry-Hill (Strawberry Hill, 1784). The Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University.

Call for Papers | HBA Sessions at CAA, 2017

Conflict as Cultural Catalyst in Britain
HBA Session at the Annual Meeting of the College Art Association, New York, 15–18 February 2017

Chair: Michael J K Walsh (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)

Proposals due by 7 April 2016

Let me have war, say I; it exceeds peace as far as day does night: it’s spritely waking, audible, and full of vent. Peace is a very apoplexy, lethargy; mull’d, deaf, sleepy, insensible; a getter of more bastard children than war’s a destroyer of men.
–William Shakespeare, 1607, Coriolanus, Act IV Sc. V

This panel investigates the relationship between struggle and conflict (be it social, political, territorial, ideological etc) and artistic production in Britain and its empire. More specifically, ‘Conflict as Cultural Catalyst in Britain’ interrogates the contentious philosophical notion that art thrives in times of war, and expires in peace, and then asks whether art, as a form of social barometer, can anticipate / foreshadow conflict, or merely respond to it. How has cultural production derived from conflict been used to create specific social identities, national histories and contemporary concepts of memory in Britain and beyond? A range of historically and geographically diverse case studies is encouraged, spanning both the globe and the centuries.

If you would be interested in participating in this panel, please contact the chair at mwalsh@ntu.edu.sg, attaching your proposal, limited to 400 words, together with a brief c.v., by April 7th, 2016.


Transglobal Collecting: Co-Producing and Re-visioning British Art Abroad
HBA Session at the Annual Meeting of the College Art Association, New York, 15–18 February 2017

Chair: Julie Codell (Arizona State University)

Proposals due by 7 April 2016

This session will focus on art collecting of British outside Britain. The study of art collecting has blossomed; studies of agents, dealers, collectors and auctions are subjects of recent conferences (three in London in 2016 alone) and publications.  Art collecting, both as a form of reception and as a form of art production (e.g., theories of Walter Benjamin, Pierre Bourdieu, museology studies), created new contexts, meanings, audiences and interpretations for art. Collecting intervened into aesthetic, national, economic, hermeneutic and social valuations of art. This was even more dramatic and transformative when collectors of British art lived outside Britain. Panelists may consider questions such as (but not limited to): How was an artwork’s social and cultural functions re-defined/re-purposed by distant geographies? How did distant collecting blend local, national and global ideas and interests? Did transatlantic or colonial collecting have distinct cultural features, purposes and identities? Did collected British art affect production of local/indigenous art outside Britain and vice versa? How did collecting British art abroad shape museums and cultural exchanges abroad? How was art positioned to affect distant spectators culturally and nationally, and who constituted that public?

If you would be interested in participating in this panel, please contact the chair at julie.codell@asu.edu, attaching your proposal, limited to 400 words, together with a brief c.v., by April 7th, 2016.

Book Award Winners for 2014 Publications

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The Historians of British Art is pleased to announce Book Award winners for publications from 2014. The winners were chosen from a nominating list of over eighty books from more than twenty different presses. Awards are granted in three categories:

Pre-1800

Paul Binski, Gothic Wonder: Art, Artifice, and the Decorated Style, 1290–1350, (London: Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, 2014), 452 pages, ISBN: 978-0300204001, $75 / £40.

Mark Hallett, Reynolds: Portraiture in Action (London: Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, 2014), 488 pages, ISBN: 978-0300196979, $75 / £50.

Post-1800

John Potvin, Bachelors of a Different Sort: Queer Aesthetics, Material Culture and the Modern interior in Britain (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2014), 336 pages, ISBN: 978-0719084997, $110 / £75.

Multi-Author

Catherine Jolivette, ed., British Art in the Nuclear Age (Farnham: Ashgate Publishing, 2014), 306 pages, ISBN: 978-1472412768, $120.

Details are available here»