Call for Papers | HBA Session at CAA, 2018

At the 106th annual conference of the College Art Association, HBA will be represented by an affiliate session (with details below), a business meeting, and an off-site visit (still in the planning stages). A full list of panels is available from the 2018 Call for Participation.

The Image of the American Indian in Britain, ca. 1800–1930: New Critical Perspectives
Los Angeles Convention Center, 21–24 February 2018

Proposals due by 14 August 2017

The study of the representation of American Indians has gained increasing attention in recent scholarship. This history, however, has been almost exclusively written from a North American perspective. In nineteenth-century Britain a widespread fascination with Native American cultures was connected to wider debates about empire and the transatlantic world. But what Kate Flint termed the “Transatlantic Indian” in her pioneering study has remained largely unexamined. This interdisciplinary session seeks to explore the various ways in which native peoples from the United States and Canada, and the artifacts of their cultures, were being represented, portrayed, studied, and collected in Britain in the long nineteenth century. Possible topics for discussion might include: Buffalo Bill’s Wild West shows and other live performances; George Catlin’s Indian Gallery in London; ethnographic museums and displays; displays of sculptures at the international exhibitions and other venues; photography and its circulation; and illustrations and the printed press. We welcome papers that address specific case studies or larger conceptual issues. This session is sponsored by the Historians of British Art.

To submit a proposal, please follow CAA guidelines. Proposals should be submitted directly to the session chairs: Martina Droth, Yale Center for British Art (martina.droth@yale.edu), and Michael Hatt, Warwick University (M.Hatt@warwick.ac.uk).

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Book Award Winners for 2015 Publications

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The Historians of British Art is pleased to announce Book Award winners for publications from 2015. The winners were chosen from a nominating list of over eighty books from more than twenty different presses. Awards are granted in three categories:

Pre-1800

Margaret Aston, Broken Idols of the English Reformation (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2015), 1128 pages, ISBN: 978  05217  70187, $200.

Post-1800

Jordan Bear, Disillusioned: Victorian Photography and the Discerning Subject (University Park: Penn State University Press, 2015), 216 pages, ISBN: 978  02710  65014, $75.

Multi-Author

Lucy Bradnock, Courtney J. Martin, and Rebecca Peabody, eds., Lawrence Alloway: Critic and Curator (Los Angeles: Getty Research Institute, 2015), 224 pages, ISBN 978  16060  64429, $40.

Tarnya Cooper, Aviva Burnstock, Maurice Howard, and Edward Town, eds., Painting in Britain, 1500–1630: Production, Influences, and Patronage (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015), 400 pages, ISBN: 978  019726  5840, $250.

Details are available here»

HBA Publication Grant

Applications due by 15 January 2017

Each year HBA awards a grant to offset publication costs for a book manuscript or peer-reviewed journal article in the field of British art or visual culture that has been accepted for publication. To be eligible for the $600 award, applicants must be current members of HBA who can demonstrate that the HBA subvention will replace their out of pocket costs. Applications are not accepted from institutions. To apply, send a 500-word project description, publication information (correspondence from press or journal confirming commitment to publish and projected publication date), budget, and CV to Kimberly Rhodes, HBA Prize Committee Chair, krhodes@drew.edu by 15 January 2017.

Now Taking Nominations: Top 100 British Art Books, 1600–1850

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The 100 Most Important Books for Understanding British Art, 1600–1850

As a cooperative initiative with Choice Magazine, the Historians of British Art (HBA) is working to assemble a list of the most important books for understanding British art produced between 1600 and 1850. The project, which will result in a bibliographic review essay for Choice, is particularly aimed at strengthening library holdings, and so nominations of studies broad in scope or significance are especially useful. In addition to studies of paintings, sculpture, and print culture, scholarship addressing country houses, gardens, decorative arts, patronage, and the history of exhibitions and collections for the period are welcome. Exhibition catalogues, historiographical studies, and works that situate British art within international contexts are also welcome. Books published within the past 10–20 years will anchor the final list, but nominations of titles from any period are eligible. Self-nominations are entirely appropriate. Don’t be shy. Nominate early and often!

Nominations may be submitted here—through the comments function—or emailed directly to HBA president, Craig Hanson, Top100BritishArtBooks@gmail.com. Nominations due by June 1.

Image: John Carter, View of the Library at Strawberry Hill, watercolour, 23.7 × 28.8 cm, from Horace Walpole, A Description of the Villa … at Strawberry-Hill (Strawberry Hill, 1784). The Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University.

Call for Papers | HBA Sessions at CAA, 2017

Conflict as Cultural Catalyst in Britain
HBA Session at the Annual Meeting of the College Art Association, New York, 15–18 February 2017

Chair: Michael J K Walsh (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)

Proposals due by 7 April 2016

Let me have war, say I; it exceeds peace as far as day does night: it’s spritely waking, audible, and full of vent. Peace is a very apoplexy, lethargy; mull’d, deaf, sleepy, insensible; a getter of more bastard children than war’s a destroyer of men.
–William Shakespeare, 1607, Coriolanus, Act IV Sc. V

This panel investigates the relationship between struggle and conflict (be it social, political, territorial, ideological etc) and artistic production in Britain and its empire. More specifically, ‘Conflict as Cultural Catalyst in Britain’ interrogates the contentious philosophical notion that art thrives in times of war, and expires in peace, and then asks whether art, as a form of social barometer, can anticipate / foreshadow conflict, or merely respond to it. How has cultural production derived from conflict been used to create specific social identities, national histories and contemporary concepts of memory in Britain and beyond? A range of historically and geographically diverse case studies is encouraged, spanning both the globe and the centuries.

If you would be interested in participating in this panel, please contact the chair at mwalsh@ntu.edu.sg, attaching your proposal, limited to 400 words, together with a brief c.v., by April 7th, 2016.


Transglobal Collecting: Co-Producing and Re-visioning British Art Abroad
HBA Session at the Annual Meeting of the College Art Association, New York, 15–18 February 2017

Chair: Julie Codell (Arizona State University)

Proposals due by 7 April 2016

This session will focus on art collecting of British outside Britain. The study of art collecting has blossomed; studies of agents, dealers, collectors and auctions are subjects of recent conferences (three in London in 2016 alone) and publications.  Art collecting, both as a form of reception and as a form of art production (e.g., theories of Walter Benjamin, Pierre Bourdieu, museology studies), created new contexts, meanings, audiences and interpretations for art. Collecting intervened into aesthetic, national, economic, hermeneutic and social valuations of art. This was even more dramatic and transformative when collectors of British art lived outside Britain. Panelists may consider questions such as (but not limited to): How was an artwork’s social and cultural functions re-defined/re-purposed by distant geographies? How did distant collecting blend local, national and global ideas and interests? Did transatlantic or colonial collecting have distinct cultural features, purposes and identities? Did collected British art affect production of local/indigenous art outside Britain and vice versa? How did collecting British art abroad shape museums and cultural exchanges abroad? How was art positioned to affect distant spectators culturally and nationally, and who constituted that public?

If you would be interested in participating in this panel, please contact the chair at julie.codell@asu.edu, attaching your proposal, limited to 400 words, together with a brief c.v., by April 7th, 2016.

Book Award Winners for 2014 Publications

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The Historians of British Art is pleased to announce Book Award winners for publications from 2014. The winners were chosen from a nominating list of over eighty books from more than twenty different presses. Awards are granted in three categories:

Pre-1800

Paul Binski, Gothic Wonder: Art, Artifice, and the Decorated Style, 1290–1350, (London: Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, 2014), 452 pages, ISBN: 978-0300204001, $75 / £40.

Mark Hallett, Reynolds: Portraiture in Action (London: Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, 2014), 488 pages, ISBN: 978-0300196979, $75 / £50.

Post-1800

John Potvin, Bachelors of a Different Sort: Queer Aesthetics, Material Culture and the Modern interior in Britain (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2014), 336 pages, ISBN: 978-0719084997, $110 / £75.

Multi-Author

Catherine Jolivette, ed., British Art in the Nuclear Age (Farnham: Ashgate Publishing, 2014), 306 pages, ISBN: 978-1472412768, $120.

Details are available here»

Allison Young Receives the 2016 HBA Travel Grant

I’m delighted to announce that Allison Young is the recipient of the 2016 HBA Travel Grant. She’ll be presenting her paper “The Image of the ‘Riot’ in Gavin Jantjes’ Political Prints” in the panel Afrotropes at the 2016 College Art Association Annual Conference in Washington D.C., to be held February 3–6.

As Allison notes in her application:

My paper considers a series of screen-prints made by the South African artist Gavin Jantjes in the late 1970s and 1980s, while he was living in exile in London after almost a decade in Hamburg. Janjtes’s work was informed by his entry into a local artistic milieu, and reflects visually the influence of British Pop artists such as Joe Tilson and Richard Hamilton, while also sharing with these artists an interest in the media’s role in steering public discourse on social and political topics. My paper focuses on his use of British newspaper clippings documenting the 1976 Soweto Uprisings in South Africa, when militarized police opened fire during a student protest. I argue that meaning may also be read in light of similar events escalating concurrently in Britain, most notably in the aftermath of riots at the 1976 Notting Hill Carnival. . .

[The paper] highlights the ways in which foreign-born and minority artists are central, not peripheral, to the history and evolution of British art in the twentieth century. Jantjes’s presence in the London art scene in the 1980s, as an artist, writer and curator, had an undeniable impact not only on the development of his own practice but also on the British organizations with which he was involved, including the Arts Council of Great Britain, where he was a key consultant in forging the Council’s policy on cultural diversity, and Iniva (Institute of International Visual Arts).

Congratulations, Allison!

Kim Rhodes

Call for Papers | HBA Young Scholar Session, CAA 2016

Historians of British Art Young Scholar Session
College Art Association, Washington, D.C., Friday, 5 February 2016, 7:30–9:00am

Proposals due by 18 December 2015

The Historians of British Art, a CAA-affiliated society, seeks papers for an upcoming mini-session of work by emerging scholars to be held during the HBA Business Meeting at CAA in Washington, D.C. (February 5, 2016). Current or recent graduate students are invited to submit proposals (if a Ph.D. recipient, the degree must have been earned within the past three years). Papers may address any topic related to British art, architecture, and visual culture and should be limited to fifteen minutes. This is an opportunity for informal presentations of new or ongoing research followed by open discussion.

To submit a paper for consideration, please send the following items to Craig Hanson, HBA President, at CraigAshleyHanson@gmail.com: (1) a one page abstract; (2) a C.V. (limited to two pages).; and (3) a brief cover letter explaining interest in the field. The deadline for submission is December 18, 2015. Upon selection, each presenter will be requested to join HBA if not already a member.

HBA Publication Grant

Proposals due by 15 January 2016

Each year HBA awards a grant to offset publication costs for a book manuscript or peer-reviewed journal article in the field of British art or visual culture that has been accepted for publication. To be eligible for the $600 award, applicants must be current members of HBA. To apply, send a 500-word project description, publication information (correspondence from press or journal confirming commitment to publish and projected publication date), budget, and CV to Kimberly Rhodes, HBA Prize Committee Chair, krhodes@drew.edu by 15 January 2016.

HBA Travel Award for Graduate Students

Proposals due by 15 October 2015

HBA is accepting applications for this year’s Travel Award. The award is designated for a graduate student member of Historians of British Art who will be presenting a paper on British art or visual culture at an academic conference in 2016. The award of $750 is intended to offset travel costs. Applicants must be current members of HBA. To apply, send a letter of request, a copy of the letter of acceptance from the organizer of the conference session, an abstract of the paper to be presented, a budget of estimated expenses (noting what items may be covered by other resources), and a CV to Kimberly Rhodes, Prize Committee Chair, HBA, krhodes@drew.edu. The deadline is October 15, 2015.